Magazines, Photography

Magazine Canteen

Notebook: Friday 13 April 2018 | MAGAZINES | PHOTOGRAPHY


In February this year there was sad news that the The Hyman Archive, the world’s largest collection of magazines, had gone into administration. The collection was started by James Hyman 30 years ago and contains more than 5,000 different publications and 120,000 different issues which are housed in a Woolwich warehouse. It began operating as a business in September 2014 and attracted various paying customers from academia and the media. There had been plans to digitise the whole collection to make it available online but I guess these have now all ground to a halt.

Recently I stumbled across another big magazine collection called Magazine Canteen which is owned and curated by Warren Casey from a large ex-hotel in Cumbria. The collection is smaller than the Hyman Archive but still numbers around 30,000 magazines. Warren began collecting magazines 30 years ago, starting with Smash Hits and he specialises in titles that he is personally interested in such as fashion, music and lifestyle. Unlike the Hyman Collection, the majority of Magazine Canteen’s mags are all for sale although Warren always tries to maintain a full collection of his favourites such as ID, GQ and the Sunday Times magazine. I was particularly interested in the old Sunday Times and Observer mags – Warren has every issue since they were both launched in the early 60s – and a small selection of covers with photos by Don McCullin and Brian Duffy are shown below.

I spent far too long gorging myself on Magazine Canteen’s Instagram site which will give you a real taster of just some of the thousands of magazines held in Warren Casey’s collection – here are a couple of images that caught my eye.

For some classic Sunday Times magazine covers and spreads from the early 1960s, have a rummage here.
Warren Casey can be contacted at Magazine Canteen.


All Good Magazines go to Heaven: A January 2018 feature from the New York Times about the Hyman Archive, written just before they went into administration.