All posts filed under: Infographics

Remembering Peter Sullivan

Notebook 17 January 2016 | NEWSPAPERS | INFOGRAPHICS I’ve been helping with some teaching on the excellent Design for Publishing course at Norwich University of the Arts (NUA). The students have been set a project by Gordon Beckett, the Design Editor of The Sunday Times, that requires them to redesign pages of The Sunday Times print and digital editions. It’s made me think back to those glory years of The Sunday Times in the late 60s, 70s and 80s when the paper (and magazine) was renowned for its investigative journalism, great photography and strong design, under the editorship of Harold Evans. A highlight for me each week were the brilliant infographics drawn by the illustrator and graphic designer, Peter Sullivan. His drawings would explain the sequence of events in a major news story and would really help to bring that story to life – such as how the passengers and crew were rescued from the Zeebrugge ferry disaster in 1987 (above) and how the Chilean president Augusto Pinochet survived an ambush and assassination attempt in 1986 (below). Peter Sullivan died in 1996. You …

Archie Archambault’s maps

Notebook: 12 November 2015 | INFOGRAPHICS Archie Archambault describes himself as a designer and inventor. He’s an American who lives in both Portland, Oregon and Brooklyn, New York. He makes his own special ‘mental diagrams’ of cities – simple but rather beautiful maps that he prints by hand on a 19th century letterpress printer. Whereas a traditional map will be full of information, Archie strips away any unnecessary detail so that the map becomes a series of districts defined by circles and linked by straight lines – much in the same way that a resident would picture it – a mental map that comes from the his head through his own city wanderings and from the heads of locals. You can look at Archie’s maps here on his website. Most of his maps are of US cities but he’s produced one of Amsterdam that reduces the ring of canals to simple concentric circles. He’s never been to London and so he’s never had the opportunity to walk its streets and travel on the underground to map it, but if he did …

Letraset, cardboard and a blackboard easel: TV infographics 1980 style

Notebook: 9 October 2015 | INFOGRAPHICS In the summer of 1980 I had a holiday job at BBC TV Department of Current Affairs in Lime Grove, West London where I helped out on the programmes Nationwide and Panorama and some of the simple information graphics that I created for Nationwide are pictured above. They were all created with coloured paper, a scalpel and a few sheets of Letraset – this was the days before computer aided design, and the introduction of Quantel Paintbox, which revolutionised the production of television graphics, was still a year away. Nationwide was a popular news and current affairs programme – same sort of format as the BBC Breakfast show of today, but it was broadcast between 6 and 7pm each weekday evening, running from 1969-1983. It was presented by Sue Lawley, Sue Cook, Hugh Scully and the infamous Frank Bough, amongst others. The Nationwide editorial department was a large open-plan office above the TV studio a couple of floors down. Along one side of the office was a hatch and counter which opened on to …

The Navigator

Notebook: 5 October 2015 | INFOGRAPHICS How Ray got from A to B before satnav Ray had been a navigator in the RAF during the latter stages of WWII, in Wellington and Liberator bombers, seeing action in the Mediterranean and then, at the end of the war, helping transport troops and POWs back from Italy and Germany to Britain. He later worked for the Ordnance Survey. He had a great sense of direction and a real knack of finding his way from A to B, whether it be navigating an aircraft from Munich to Cambridgeshire or driving his Ford Capri across London. The stars would guide him at night time and he’d note the sun’s position and landmarks during the day, and of course he had a large range of maps to help see him home as well. A favourite was The Reader’s Digest AA Book of the Road published in 1966 which featured ingenious ‘continuity flaps’ that allowed east-west/west-east routes to be followed from page to page without the reader losing their position. But trying to …